Riding in Lights – Part II

Just do it. The best time to do anything is right now. This sentiment is responsible for many of my rash decisions, but more times than not it gets the job done. On Nov 7th, when my friends excused themselves due to pressing engagements and decided to postpone the night ride to a later date. I decided to go on as planned and now I know I can bike the toughest terrain I can handle in daylight, at night. And incidentally the postponed ride is yet to materialize. :)

My previous trip, made me realize that the headlamp wasn’t good enough for the sort of ride I had in mind. I wanted to bike through the most technical sections that I can manage in daylight; to prove to myself that night riding was possible without any limitations. I was sure that this was not an original thought, and there would be people who have done this and much more. A trip to REI reveled the desired equipment, halogen light’s, 6.5 Watt per bulb, powered by a 6 volt NiMH battery. The bulbs can be independently switched, and have a runtime 1.5 hrs when both are turned on. (3hrs with one). With the halogen light, headlamps, gloves and warm clothing, I was ready for the trail.

I started with both bulbs on, but soon realized one was sufficient. Within minutes, I was coasting, the only problem – spotting diversions inthe trail. The light is so focused straight on, that it is easy to miss turns, and just as easy to mistake small paths between trees as the trail. I took a wrong turn looped 1.5 miles to be back to where I started. Nevertheless, I was determined to finish the toughest section of the trail leading to a lake and decided to press on, switching off the lights every time I took a break. :) I made it to the lake with just one fall, entirely my fault. Some animal jumped in front of the trail and its shining eyes, the only part visible, spooked me. I hit the breaks hard and ended up doing an endo. Other than this minor incident the ride was very pleasurable, I spotted dears, never felt tired, and could maneuver over obstacles.

I would recommend it to anyone who is thinking about it. All the obstacles are before you get to the trail head, from then on its mountain biking as usual. Just do it.

About amit

I was born in Kanpur, India in 1977. I did my schooling partly in Kanpur, Surat and Udaipur. I spent most of my schooling years in Udaipur in a boarding school. This was the most enjoyable period of my life predominantly because I made a lot of friends and played a lot of football (my first love). My school years brought in a sinking realization that I was good in academics, average in football [even after my most sincere efforts :( ] and to put it euphemistically 'artistically challenged'. Hence cool careers in photography, sports, art & design or music were all beyond me. I took up what I could do best, and enrolled for engineering at Nagpur University. College brought its own pleasures, I had my share of beers, bunked classes, read the 'Bhagvad Gita', learned yoga and picked up love for traveling. After graduating I was one of the lucky few to get a great job at Infosys Technologies. The best thing I got from my first job - my Yamaha Rx 135. There were not many weekends when I did not explore places in and around Bangalore on it. In two years though my desire to pursue further studies caught up with me and I enrolled for a M.S in Computer Networking at North Carolina State University. Here I picked up basketball, love for stand up comedy, liking for the 'other football' and offcourse a little bit of computer networking. I graduated in Dec 2002 and am currently working for /n Software. I am slowly evolving into a die hard Linux and Open Source enthusiast, trying to pick up skydiving, biking, running and photography. Some might call that progress. :)
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4 Responses to Riding in Lights – Part II

  1. doodum says:

    you’re crazy

  2. Amit says:

    Thanks doodum, but you give me too much credit.

    Here’s a short excerpt from Guy Kawasaki’s book “Rule for Revolutionaries”

    “Here’s to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in a square hole, the ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules, and they have no respect for status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them, because they change things. They push the human race forward, and while some may see them as crazy ones, we see genius, because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who’ll do it.”

  3. doodum says:

    Ok…but I’m pretty sure you’re just crazy.

  4. Aditi says:

    I hear you doodum and raise you a couple, he is STARK RAVING MAD!

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